Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd. Survey on the abolition of ceremonies What is the difference between “ceremonies” and “kyorei”? How to give New Year’s cards and year-end gifts that don’t become “empty”?

Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd.
[Survey on the abolition of Kurei] What is the difference between “ceremonies” and “Kurei”? How to give New Year’s cards and year-end gifts that don’t become “empty”?
More than 70% of respondents agreed with the abolition of formal formalities, while about 60% answered that there is some meaning in conveying gratitude by giving gifts.

Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Nagaoka City, Niigata Prefecture; Representative Director: Yukio Watanabe) conducted a survey on men and women in their 20s to 60s on the abolition of formalities.
In recent years, it seems that more and more companies are abolishing ceremonies such as New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts.
From the perspective of sustainability and SDGs, I think that there are many things that reflect the times, such as “consideration for the environment”, “cost reduction”, and “improvement of work efficiency”, but they are “formal and meaningless”. There may be a reason such as “because it’s not a ritual but a ‘fake ceremony'”.
Perhaps that is why it is called “abolition of empty ceremonies” rather than “abolition of rituals”.
What is the difference between rituals and ceremonies?
Rites of passage such as Shichi-go-san and Coming-of-Age Ceremonies are also rituals, but how do you recognize them? Also, when giving gifts as a ritual, formalities such as Noshi and Mizuhiki are indispensable. How important do you think it is?
Therefore, this time, Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd.
(https://www.ajinoren.co.jp/), a manufacturer of 100% domestic rice crackers and rice crackers sent directly from Niigata factories, targets men and women in their 20s to 60s. , conducted a survey on the “abolition of empty formalities”.
Would you like to think about what kind of ritual is a meaningful ritual together?
What do you think about rites of passage?
What are your thoughts on rituals and rites of passage?
First of all, I asked about rituals that I thought were meaningless to perform. [Image 1

When asked, “How many ceremonies (including rites of passage) do you think are meaningless?”, 8.2% answered, “Almost all ceremonies have meaning.” (45.6%), “I think most rituals are meaningless (34.5%),” and “Almost all rituals are meaningless (11.7%).” I was.
Japanese rites of passage include shrine visits, shichi-go-san, coming-of-age ceremonies, and weddings.
I think that many of these ceremonies and rites of passage have some kind of meaning, but the most common response was “I think most ceremonies have meaning” at 45.6%, while “Almost 8.2% of the respondents answered that there is a meaning to performing all rituals, falling short of 10%.
So, what are the characteristics of “rituals that are meaningless to perform”? Therefore, when asked, “What kind of ritual do you think is a meaningless ritual? (Multiple answers allowed),” those who answered “It is not heartfelt (52.0%).” was the most common, followed by “formal (51.1%),” “not considering the other person (self-satisfied) (41.8%),” “useless (31.5%),” and “conventional This was followed by (traditional) items (26.2%), “just for decoration (24.3%)” and “low value (no value) items (21.2%).”
It seems that many people feel that there is little point in performing rituals that are not heartfelt, formal, or that do not give consideration to the other party.
Many people may think that formal exchanges such as New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts are meaningless.
What do you think about the abolition of formalities that each company is doing? In recent years, it is not uncommon for companies to abolish the exchange of New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts. There may be an increasing number of companies who consider formal exchanges to be “courtesy” because they are not heartfelt or considerate of the other party.
So, how do you feel about the “abolition of formalities” that these companies are doing?
[Image 2

When asked, “What do you think about the abolition of empty
formalities* that companies are doing? *Abolition of exchanges of New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts,” 27.8% said, “I think it’s a very good thing,” and “To some extent.” 43.3% think it’s a good thing, 23.2% can’t say either way, and 5.7% think it’s a bad thing.
More than 70% of respondents answered that it was a good thing (I think it’s a very good thing, I think it’s a good thing to some extent).
On the other hand, it seems that more than 20% of the respondents answered that they could not say either way (I think it is a bad thing). Why did you think so?
We asked the specific reasons for those who answered “I can’t say either way” or “I think it’s a bad thing” in the previous question. ■The abolition of formalities by companies is not all good! ? What is the reason?
・I think it depends on the relationship with the other person, but I think it’s a great opportunity to express your gratitude (giving New Year’s cards and mid-year gifts) to people who have been indebted to you but have few opportunities to meet in person. 20s/female/company employee/Fukuoka Prefecture)
・It is true that expenses can be reduced, but I don’t think there is a need to cut back on things to express our gratitude to those who are indebted to us on a daily basis. I think we should reduce other things more (20s/female/office worker/Kagoshima Prefecture)
・Personally, I don’t think it’s necessary, but I think there are people who need it. (30s/female/part-time job/Tokyo)
・It may seem like it’s just a formality, but I think it’s important to be able to continue to connect through that exchange
(50s/female/full-time housewife/Shiga Prefecture)
and other responses were received.
It depends on what kind of relationship you have, but even formal exchanges such as New Year’s cards and mid-year gifts seem to be a good opportunity for those who need them and who can continue to connect with them. am.
What should I do to give meaning to the ritual of gifting items…? According to the survey so far, there are people who feel that rites of passage (rites of passage) that are formal and not heartfelt, or that do not consider the other person are “empty rites” and that there is little point in doing them. It turns out that there are many. It seems that more than 70% of companies that “abolish formalities” for New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts are better. On the other hand, we found that some people think that the abolition of New Year’s cards and mid-year gifts, even though they are empty formalities, is not good to let go because there is a possibility of losing the connection between people.
So, in fact, how meaningful is it to convey your feelings of gratitude to the other party with items such as New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts?
[Image 3

So, when asked, “How meaningful do you think the ‘ritual’ of sending New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts is as a way of expressing gratitude to those who have been indebted to you?” 8.8% think so,” 51.4% think it is meaningful to some extent, 25.6% cannot say either way, and 14.2% think it is meaningless.”
While many companies are abolishing the system, it was found that about 60% of people in total felt that there was a meaning to conveying their gratitude to the other party when it came to exchanging New Year’s cards and sending mid-year and year-end gifts. rice field.
So, what should we be careful about in order to make New Year’s cards and mid-year gifts not “empty” but truly meaningful “rituals”? I asked about specific methods.
■ What should I do? What are the tips to express your gratitude to your partner in New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts? ・Add a handwritten note to the printed New Year’s card. The family of the person will be pleased with the mid-year gift and the year-end gift. (40s/female/part-time job/Akita Prefecture)
・I can’t express my gratitude with empty courtesy. An empty courtesy is just an empty courtesy (50s/male/office worker/Hokkaido)
・New Year’s cards are handwritten, and year-end gifts are visited in person to say hello (50s/male/office worker/Tokyo)
・ Give polite comments to people you really appreciate (60s / male / office worker / Shizuoka Prefecture)
and other responses were received.
For mid-year and year-end gifts, it is best to meet the person in person and convey your gratitude along with the item, but if that is difficult, it would be better to think about the person and choose an item that they will be pleased with.
Also, in the case of printed New Year’s cards, it seems important to add a handwritten note, even if it is troublesome.
You may be able to express your gratitude to some extent by giving a gift, but if it is an “offhand” to the recipient, it will be meaningless, so you may need to be careful.
format? price? feeling? What is the most important thing when giving gifts? What is the most important thing when expressing gratitude to the other person by giving gifts, not just for mid-year gifts and year-end gifts?
[Image 4

When asked, “What elements do you think are important when performing a gift-giving ceremony? (Top 3),” the most common response was “Does it convey your heart (59.8%)?” This was followed by “Whether it pleases (55.2%),” “Is it useful?” (24.1%), “Is the timing (season) appropriate? or (3.5%)”.
According to the results of the previous survey, it seems that the most important point is “whether the heart is conveyed (to the other party)”, which is not a formality but an empty courtesy without it. In addition, it seems to be good to pay attention to points such as “whether (the other party) will be pleased” and “whether the item is useful”.
In addition to “does it convey your heart?”, when giving gifts, forms such as noshi and mizuhiki are also important.
These formalities cannot be neglected, especially when gifting items as part of formal ceremonies.
Then, when compared with “whether the heart is conveyed”, which one is more important?
[Image 5

So, when asked, “Do you think that the format of the ritual (noshi, mizuhiki, etc.) doesn’t matter as long as your heart is conveyed to the other party?” 42.2% of respondents thought it was important to some extent even if it was communicated, and 10.7% said that it was important whether it was communicated or not (10.7%).
Although it was a narrow margin, most of the respondents thought that the format did not matter so much as long as the heart was conveyed. So what happens when you compare the contents (price)?
Next, when asked, “Do you think the price or content of the gift doesn’t matter if you can convey your heart to the other person?” (45.1%) and “I think it’s important whether it’s communicated or not (9.0%).”
Although there is a slight difference here, most people seem to think that the contents and price do not matter so much as long as the heart is conveyed.
If you want to convey your gratitude to the other person by giving a gift, it seems that the most important thing to focus on is whether you can convey your heart rather than the form or the contents. What exactly do you need to do to make the gift a truly meaningful “ritual”? I learned that when you want to convey your gratitude with an item, the “heart” is more important than the form and content.
So, how exactly do we convey our sincerity?
It’s a difficult question because it’s case-by-case, but I’ll ask you at the end.
■ What kind of gift should be given to make it a meaningful “ritual” rather than “an empty courtesy”?
・I think it’s necessary if you don’t just give it as an annual event, but if you need to give it to the other person (30s/female/part-time job/Hyogo Prefecture)
・It depends on the time and occasion, but I think that a gift that is not bound by formality will convey sincerity and have meaning (40s / female / full-time housewife / Tokyo)
・It would be better to give something that the other party will be happy with at the time that suits you and the other party, instead of the custom of “midyear gifts” and “year-end gifts”
(50s/female/part-time job/Kanagawa)
・Items that are not too expensive, not too cheap, and that will please the other person or family (60s/male/office worker/Kanagawa
Prefecture)
and other responses were received.
Rather than giving gifts according to custom or formality, if you give gifts at a time that suits you and the other person, and think about what the other person needs and what you think they will like, it will be less likely to be a “courtesy”.
[Summary] Let’s think about thanking the other person in a way that conveys courtesy, not empty courtesy
In this survey, the difference between rituals and imaginary rituals became clear.
“Will the heart be conveyed?” ──That is more important than the form and content (price).
However, no matter what kind of ritual (including rites of passage), rituals that are not heartfelt, only formal (formal), or that do not consider the other person are “empty rituals” and have little meaning. It looks like it’s going to be something that doesn’t exist. In fact, more and more companies are abolishing rituals such as New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts because they are empty formalities, and according to the results of this survey, more than 70% of people are evaluating the “abolition of empty
formalities.”
On the other hand, there were also opinions that it might spoil the opportunity to express gratitude to those who have been indebted, and that some people may need formal exchanges.
Regarding New Year’s cards, mid-year gifts, and year-end gifts, about 60% answered that “there is a meaning to convey gratitude to the other party” to some extent, but there is a high possibility that if you do it in a formal way, it will be an empty formality. Because of this, you can’t neglect “consideration”, such as choosing the right time to give gifts and items that are likely to be appreciated.
100% domestically produced rice crackers and rice crackers are sent directly from the factory in Niigata.
[Image 6

Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd. (https://www.ajinoren.co.jp/shop/) 100% domestic rice
Commitment to raw materials
Factory direct delivery from Niigata Wonderful things that can only be done by mail order
From hand to hand, heartfelt bonds that connect with customers We manufacture and sell rice crackers with these four commitments in mind. ■Factory direct shipment from Niigata. Delicious taste that can only be achieved through mail order
1. The reason why Aji No Renga sticks to mail-order sales directly from the factory is very simple.
Just as rice tastes best when it is freshly cooked, rice crackers, which are made from rice, are best when freshly made.
“I want you to eat something delicious while it’s delicious, and as soon as possible.”
With that in mind, since our founding in 1988, we have devoted ourselves to mail-order sales that deliver directly from our factory in Niigata to our customers.
2. The core of the deliciousness of rice crackers is the raw material, rice. At our main office, we use not only 100% domestically produced rice, but also rice with large grains that is equivalent to rice for staple food.
3. Do not apply heat when milling 100% domestically produced rice, and process the milled rice immediately as a product, so that you can enjoy the flavor of the rice to the fullest. It is a commitment for When you gently open the bag, the exceptionally fresh and fragrant aroma that rises up is also the deliciousness of our rice crackers. Many people also order it as a gift for mid-year and year-end gifts. By all means, please enjoy the deliciousness of Niigata Aji Noren Honpo’s rice crackers and okaki.
■ Niigata Ajinoren Honpo Co., Ltd.: https://www.ajinoren.co.jp/ Inquiries: 0120-585-383 (Reception hours: 9:00 am to 5:30 pm, closed on Sundays and public holidays)
■ Inquiries by FAX: 0120-826-163
■ Inquiries by email: niigata@ajinoren.co.jp
Investigation outline: Investigation on “abolition of empty formalities” [Survey period] December 23, 2022 (Friday) to December 24, 2022 (Saturday) [Survey method] Internet survey
[Number of people surveyed] 1,072 people
[Survey target] Men and women in their 20s to 60s
[Monitor provider] General Research
Details about this release:
https://prtimes.jp/main/html/rd/p/000000030.000011044.html

MAIL:cr@prtimes.co.jp

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