Skip to content
Home » Japan Red Cross More than 80% of respondents said that pre-disaster volunteer training should be made mandatory. On the other hand, approximately 70% of those with volunteer experience in disaster-stricken areas said they had not studied in advance

Japan Red Cross More than 80% of respondents said that pre-disaster volunteer training should be made mandatory. On the other hand, approximately 70% of those with volunteer experience in disaster-stricken areas said they had not studied in advance

Japan Red Cross
More than 80% of respondents said that pre-disaster volunteer training should be made mandatory. On the other hand, approximately 70% of those with volunteer experience in disaster-stricken areas said they had not studied in advance.
JRCS investigates public awareness and actual situation regarding volunteer activities
……
The Japanese Red Cross Society (Headquarters: Minato-ku, Tokyo; President: Atsushi Seike; hereinafter referred to as the “Japanese Red Cross”) operates “Local Red Cross Volunteer Groups,” which carry out support activities for the elderly in each city, ward, town, and village, and utilizes daily training to respond to disasters. Approximately 2,900 groups and approximately 850,000 Red Cross volunteers are active throughout the country, including disaster prevention volunteers who work in the event of an emergency. In Japan, the “Reiwa 6 Noto Peninsula Earthquake” (hereinafter referred to as the “Noto Peninsula Earthquake”) occurred in January, hitting four prefectures: Ishikawa, Niigata, Toyama, and Fukui. Many people were affected by the disaster, and the JRCS has been working to provide support to the affected areas, including by dispatching relief teams. Recovery and reconstruction efforts have begun in the area, including the construction of temporary housing, and along with this, the number of volunteer activities is gradually increasing, including the establishment of lodging bases for volunteers.
On the other hand, on social media, etc., people were initially asked to refrain from unnecessary and non-urgent travel to the
disaster-stricken areas, and opinions and debates regarding the nature of volunteer work were flying around, as seen with phrases such as “volunteers who don’t go.” The situation was also observed here and there.
Three months after the Noto Peninsula Earthquake, the JRCS conducted a survey of a total of 1,200 men and women, ranging from teens to over 60s, to find out the public’s awareness of volunteering.We would like to inform you of the results.
This survey was conducted in March 2024, excluding residents of the four disaster-affected prefectures.
-Highlights of survey results-
Regardless of their activities in the disaster-stricken area, 78.3% (939 people) of all respondents had never participated in a volunteer lecture (*) held by a local government or NPO before volunteering. Ta. 【Figure 1】
Furthermore, when asked whether they thought it would be a good idea to make it mandatory to learn and acquire knowledge and skills in advance in order to engage in volunteer activities in
disaster-stricken areas in the future, respondents overall answered 85.0%. % answered, “I think it would be better to make it mandatory” (408 people said “very” and 612 people said “somewhat”). 【Figure 2】
*Volunteer lecture: Defined as an opportunity to learn about the behavior and preparation required for volunteer activities, how to respond to emergencies, etc. in advance through face-to-face lectures, online meetings, watching videos, etc. (Does not include on-site explanations or orientation).
Of the 173 people who had volunteered in the disaster area in the past, 27.7% (48 people) attended a lecture beforehand, less than 30%. Of those, 85.5% answered that it was “useful” (21 “very” and 20 “somewhat”). [Figure 3]
The most common reason why it was helpful was “I was able to understand the specific activities and required behaviors in advance” at 65.9% (27 people), followed by “I was able to know what to prepare before participating in volunteering.” This was followed by 58.5% (24 people) who said, “This is because I was able to anticipate emergencies such as accidents, injuries, and unexpected troubles,” followed by 53.7% (22 people). [Figure 4]
It was also found that among the 125 people who did not participate in the pre-lecture, 73.6% (18 people said “very” and 74 people said “somewhat”) said they would like to participate in the future. [Figure 5]
On the other hand, 31.8% (55 people) of those who had volunteer experience in the disaster area answered that they were not satisfied with the activities. [Figure 6]
The top reasons for dissatisfaction were “There were restrictions on the content of my activities due to the situation in the disaster area,” at 30.9% (17 people), and 23.6% were “I had no volunteer experience and was unsure of how to act in the field.” (13 people) and 20.0% (11 people) said, “I didn’t fully understand the situation in the disaster area beforehand.” [Figure 7]
This survey also asked about changes in the public’s mindset regarding the thoughts and actions of volunteers during disasters (*). [Figure 8]
*For each item, respondents were asked about “actions that should be avoided” with reference to “Government Public Relations Online “How to Start Disaster Volunteer Activities for Those Who Want to Support Disaster Areas.”
Regarding the idea that “It is important to contact local governments in disaster-stricken areas and confirm information carefully in advance,” 65.2% (782 people) answered “I thought so in the past and recently”; 17.8% (213 people) said, “I didn’t think so, but now I think so.” More than 80% of people in total thought this way. 10.4% (125 people) said “I used to think so, but no longer think so,” and 6.7% (80 people) said “I neither used to nor recently thought so.”
Regarding the question “Volunteers sometimes need to think and act on their own initiative beyond what is asked of them,” 46.6% (559 people) said “I thought so in the past and recently,” while 46.6% (559 people) said “I didn’t think so in the past, but… 16.0% (192 people) said “I think so recently,” or over 60%.
20.9% (251 people) said, “I used to think so, but I don’t think so these days,” and 16.5% (198 people) said “I don’t think so either before or recently.”
Even when asked, “The areas with the highest needs are those affected by the disaster and should be prioritized,” 46.4% (557 people) said “I thought so in the past and recently,” while 46.4% (557 people) said “I didn’t think so in the past.” However, recently I think so.” Combined with 14.4% (173 people), 60% of people thought this way.
22.9% (275 people) said “I used to think so, but no longer think so,” and 16.3% (195 people) said “I neither used to nor recently thought so.”
Regarding the question “It is necessary for volunteers to take the lead in promoting recovery and reconstruction on behalf of the confused disaster victims,” 40.6% (487 people) answered “I think so in the past and recently.” More than half of the respondents (16.7% (200 people)) answered, “I didn’t think so before, but now I think so.”
22.8% (273 people) said, “I used to think so, but I don’t think so these days,” and 20.0% (240 people) said “I don’t think so either before or recently.”
Regarding the idea that “volunteer activities during disasters are most important to provide short-term, intensive support immediately after the disaster,” 36.2% (434 people) answered “I thought so in the past and recently,” “I didn’t think so, but recently I think so.” 15.6% (187 people), and the number of people who thought this way also exceeded 50%.
27.8% (333 people) said “I used to think so, but no longer think so,” and 20.5% (246 people) said “I neither used to think so nor recently.”
[Image 1: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-7b230ba1a1a59575cad6-0.png&s3=33257-174-d8c8a61e6e9cc6d880fb5afde0e2fac7-2206×993.png ]
Figure 1
[Image 2: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-6487421992e39b6c25fd-1.png&s3=33257-174-240b629018dc5d48cb719da866dbd3e5-2206×993.png ]
Figure 2
[Image 3: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-4a2e6e90ba92e0647f15-2.png&s3=33257-174-6bca8229fcb10d15f8799eced729a2a7-2206×993.png ]
Figure 3
[Image 4: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-61ce445d3494ea57e877-3.png&s3=33257-174-4500b1a6c98ddda9d895b076bd443710-2206×1592.png ]
Figure 4
[Image 5: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-344b88e78a822571256f-4.png&s3=33257-174-4e65f71a6b120fd1d4d7afe13a23d96f-2206×993.png ]
Figure 5
[Image 6: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-aae269c845233319b5a2-5.png&s3=33257-174-98c13a20479b71f0691af81f5a11c458-2211×993.png ]
Figure 6
[Image 7: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-cc7927e86222bfd3a64d-6.png&s3=33257-174-5d4a9916b1afe7b6e20e44f032ff66d5-2211×2010.png ]
Figure 7
[Image 8: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-108f3faaf3ce0819c5bd-7.png&s3=33257-174-097c01d54aa98ed91cef8c1955de5da1-2208×2098.png ]
Figure 8
[Table 4: https://prtimes.jp/data/corp/33257/table/174_1_806c515a75dd8fe3d2da90f6995511f0.jpg] In large-scale disasters that cause widespread damage, such as the Noto Peninsula Earthquake, the full extent of the damage is often not known immediately after the disaster occurs. Recently, there have been discussions on social media and the internet about volunteer activities, as the safety and support required cannot be confirmed in some places, and sometimes we have seen conflicting opinions. The results of this study revealed that there are differences between individuals in how volunteers think and what they think about their actions, and that changes are occurring.
Volunteer activities during disasters began to attract attention after the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (1995), and this time is also referred to as the “first year of volunteering”. The support of volunteers also played a major role in the progress of recovery and reconstruction in areas affected by subsequent disasters such as the Great East Japan Earthquake, the Kumamoto Earthquake, and the heavy rains in Western Japan.
As the JRCS, which carries out medical and relief activities and volunteer activities during disasters, we believe that it is important to “how we can be close to the affected areas and victims and provide the actions they require.” In Japan, the possibility of large-scale disasters occurring in the future is not zero. It is also important to thoroughly discuss how to act quickly and appropriately during normal times. Through volunteer activities born from the desire to help people, the JRCS will engage in various awareness-raising activities in order to foster a sense of mutual assistance in which people help each other in times of emergency.
[Table 5: https://prtimes.jp/data/corp/33257/table/174_2_1b89adff6a91a44424b60aea532c0d75.jpg ]
Red Cross volunteers are providing a variety of support to members in Ishikawa Prefecture and beyond, including transporting relief supplies, supporting relief teams, and assisting with evacuation center operations, with a total of over 1,600 people participating in these activities. (as of March 19th). In the case of this disaster, many areas were not ready to accept disaster volunteers even one month after the disaster occurred, and there were serious traffic jams that hindered rescue and support activities, making it difficult for volunteers from outside the prefecture to work in the
disaster-stricken areas. did. Meanwhile, “relief team volunteers” traveled from multiple prefectures to the disaster-stricken areas, working together with the relief teams to provide self-contained support that did not place a burden on the disaster-affected areas, taking into consideration traffic conditions.
Red Cross volunteers receive training and training during normal times, when disasters are not occurring, to acquire know-how in disaster relief operations. When a disaster occurs, participants participate in JRCS activities (information gathering, first aid, soup kitchens, transportation and distribution of relief supplies, support for evacuation centers, etc.). Rather than providing one-day assistance, we will play a role as a member of the Red Cross, providing long-term support to disaster-stricken areas.
[Table 6: https://prtimes.jp/data/corp/33257/table/174_3_f3c66029fcb891f4df4189ef4b3d95d3.jpg] Traffic and water supply conditions continue to be difficult in the disaster-stricken areas, so it is necessary to check the situation in the disaster-stricken areas and take careful actions. Volunteer activities in disaster-stricken areas require self-sufficiency, but we ask that you be even more self-sufficient with your meals, toilets, sleeping places, etc. Also, as there are differences in temperature, you are also required to take thorough measures against the cold. . Infection prevention measures such as masks and disinfection and health management are also important. Please check carefully the status of volunteer acceptance and pre-registration.
JRCS has created a booklet, “Volunteer, Stay Safe!,” which summarizes preparations and precautions before and after volunteer activities during disasters, and has posted it on its website. This booklet, supervised by a JRCS doctor, contains information on safety management such as “preparation before activities,” “things to be careful of during activities,” and “how to interact with disaster victims,” so that volunteers can work safely and healthily. I am telling you. Self-care is also important, as volunteering can be stressful. This booklet also provides “key points for self-care”. You can view the contents of the booklet here.
“Volunteers, stay safe!” (JRCS website)
https://www.jrc.or.jp/volunteer-and-youth/volunteer/news/2022/0624_000999.html ▼Booklet “Volunteer, stay safe!” Summary version (partial)
[Image 9: https://prtimes.jp/i/33257/174/resize/d33257-174-228dd7011d169032d286-9.png&s3=33257-174-2cc7d19c44370aa07c0ee0e859076d38-1226×862.png ]
Volunteers, stay safe!
Survey overview
Survey name Awareness survey regarding volunteer activities (2024) Survey target: 1200 Japanese men and women (100 men and women aged 10 to over 60)
However, residents of the four prefectures of Ishikawa, Toyama, Niigata, and Fukui are excluded.
Research method    Internet survey
Research organization Rakuten Insight Co., Ltd. (survey commissioned) Survey period    March 2024
*For other detailed data, please contact the Japanese Red Cross Society Public Relations Office.
*When citing this survey, please write “2024 Japanese Red Cross Survey” or “Japanese Red Cross Society’s Awareness Survey on Volunteer Activities (2024).”
More details about this release:
https://prtimes.jp/main/html/rd/p/000000174.000033257.html



%d