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Home » Chiba Institute of Technology The microsatellite “KASHIWA” developed by Chiba Institute of Technology students has accomplished its initial mission.

Chiba Institute of Technology The microsatellite “KASHIWA” developed by Chiba Institute of Technology students has accomplished its initial mission.

Chiba Institute of Technology
KASHIWA, a microsatellite developed by Chiba Institute of Technology students, has completed its initial mission.
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KASHIWA, a microsatellite developed by Chiba Institute of Technology students, has completed its initial mission as part of a program to develop advanced engineers who can create products that work reliably in space to support the expanding space industry.
[Image: https://prtimes.jp/i/42635/54/resize/d42635-54-941c5df3996a7a26efa4-0.jpg&s3=42635-54-d7063a2f8896f22aab16287a53dd29f5-1588×1058.jpg] Exterior view of the microsatellite “KASHIWA”
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The global space industry has expanded several times over the past few years, and in Japan, not only traditional space companies but also many venture companies are proposing space business ideas and starting corporate activities. However, there is an overwhelming shortage of engineers who are essential to realizing new business ideas. Chiba Institute of Technology has been conducting the “Advanced Engineer Development Program” since April 2021 in order to develop engineers who can create satellites that can reliably realize solutions using space to solve social needs. Ta.
“KASHIWA” is a 10cmx10cmx10cm microsatellite (1U CubeSat*1) that was developed by second-year undergraduate students in January 2022. On March 22, 2024 (Japan time), the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket No. 30 was successfully launched. After being released from the International Space Station on April 11, 2024 (Japan time), communication between the ground and the satellite was established, and on June 3, 2024, an amateur station license equivalent to an artificial satellite station was issued. We confirmed the operation of the satellite’s basic functions in space, and accomplished the initial mission planned for “KASHIWA” as shown below.
Clear the minimum success level (minimum success condition) “Restore one image taken by a satellite to an image on Earth”
Sending messages to general amateur radio operators using APRS (*2) Conversion of geomagnetic data into auditory information
Over the next few months, we will take on the challenge of two-way communication of messages to general amateur radio operators using APRS, distance measurement using stereo cameras, earth observation targeting night light, etc., as well as acquiring information that KASHIWA has acquired through SNS and the website. We will publish the data.
In addition, following “KAHISWA,” we plan to launch “SAKURA” in the summer of 2024 and “YOMOGI” in the fall of 2024.
(*1) CubeSat
A microsatellite (1U size) consisting of a cube with a side of 10cm and a mass of about 1kg. Since its launch in 2003, many universities and companies from around the world have participated, and it is being used as an entry point for satellite manufacturing and operation. In recent years, practical use of 3U-sized satellites, either alone or in combination with multiple satellites, has begun.
(*2) APRS
Abbreviation for Automatic Position Reporting System, which is a packet communication protocol by which amateur radio stations distribute raw data over amateur radio waves in real time.
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https://www.perc.it-chiba.ac.jp/news/2024/06/03/3149/
More details about this release:
https://prtimes.jp/main/html/rd/p/000000054.000042635.html



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