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Home » Price increase impact over 80% Electronic flyer service “Shufoo!”, attitude survey regarding year-end and New Year holidays

Price increase impact over 80% Electronic flyer service “Shufoo!”, attitude survey regarding year-end and New Year holidays

ONE COMPATH Co., Ltd.
Electronic flyer service “Shufoo!” conducts awareness survey regarding year-end and New Year holidays
Even though more than 80% were affected by price increases, the spending during the year-end and New Year holidays remained unchanged, with “Osechi cuisine” and “New Year’s gifts” at the top of the list.Those who look forward to the year-end and New Year holidays were “Shimane Prefecture” in 1st place, “Wakayama Prefecture” in 2nd place, and 3rd in “Wakayama Prefecture”. Miyazaki prefecture ……
Shufoo!, one of the largest e-flyer services in Japan, operated by ONE COMPATH Co., Ltd., a member of the TOPPAN Group, will be offering a service from November 17, 2023 to 6,016 men and women nationwide who use Shufoo! We conducted an awareness survey regarding the year-end and New Year holidays on the 20th of May.
80% of people answered that recent price increases will affect their spending during the year-end and New Year holidays. Among them, the top expenses during the year-end and New Year holidays were “New Year’s dishes” and “New Year’s gifts,” followed by “transportation expenses to return home.” Continuing from last year, only about 60% of people answered that they had a positive image of the year-end and New Year holidays, with many saying things like “I’m having trouble with high prices” and “I’m worried about the future.” As a result, there were harsh comments such as “I will not do any special shopping during the year-end and New Year holidays” and “I will reduce the number of osechi items.”
Release URL: https://onecompath.com/news/release/14439/《Awareness survey regarding the year-end and New Year holidays》 ■ 60% of impressions about the year-end and New Year holidays are positive Slight increase compared to last year, but did not recover until before the price increase rush ■ Year-end and New Year expenses A record 36.3% said the amount was “less than 10,000 yen.” Price increases affected spending during the year-end and New Year holidays by more than 80% ■ The highest expense was “Osechi Ryori.” A hybrid of homemade and purchased food was popular. 39.0% said they didn’t eat it. ■ Lucky bags. 15.5% of people want to buy it. There is a big difference in the image of lucky bags between those who want to buy it and those who don’t. ■The way of eating ozoni is different between East and West. “Easy to make it in the microwave” is also popular ■Favorite way to eat mochi is No.1 Soy sauce , 2nd place: Sugar soy sauce, 3rd place: Kinako (soybean flour) is at the top by a close margin ■ Impressions of the year-end and New Year holidays: 60% are positive Slight increase compared to last year, but the price has not recovered to before the price increase rush
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When asked about their impressions of the year-end and New Year holidays, 60.1% of people answered that they had a positive image (19.3% were positive, 40.8% were somewhat positive). Opinions that people are looking forward to events as the coronavirus pandemic subsides include “I’m planning a trip now that the coronavirus has calmed down” (female in her 60s) and “I want to resume my New Year’s visit after refraining for a while” (female in her 30s). had. It seems that an increasing number of people are looking forward to reuniting with family and friends without hesitation, such as “It’s been a long time since I’ve been with my family.” (Female in her 50s) Although the number of people with a “positive” impression has increased slightly from last year, there is a wide difference from the figure in 2021 (69.1%), when the survey was conducted before the price increase rush.
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On the other hand, the number of people who answered “somewhat negative” (23.7%) and “negative” (16.3%) increased from last year to 39.9% of the total. Due to recent increases in the prices of food, daily necessities, utility bills, etc., many people say, “I don’t have money because of the high prices, so I can’t spend money during the New Year holidays” (female in her 50s), “Store is crowded and I can’t buy regular food.” Many people said, “It gets expensive.” (Male in his 60s) In addition, some people were worried about the uncertain future of the year-end and New Year holidays, as “I’m worried about the unstable world situation” (female in her 40s), coupled with the recent international situation. We compiled the rankings of people who answered “positive” or “slightly positive” toward the year-end and New Year holidays by prefecture. Shimane Prefecture was the most looking forward to the New Year’s holidays at 73.3%, while Yamagata Prefecture was the lowest at 40.0%. There seems to be a tendency for Western Japan, which has many relatively warm regions, to receive slightly higher points, while positive impressions tend to be lower, especially in regions that get a lot of snow, such as the Tohoku and Hokuriku regions. ■Most spending during the year-end and New Year holidays was “less than 10,000 yen” at 36.3%. Price increases affected spending during the New Year holidays by more than 80%.
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We asked them about their spending during the year-end and New Year holidays. “Less than 10,000 yen” ranked first at 36.3%, followed by “10,000 to 30,000 yen” at 28.4%, and “30,000 to 50,000 yen” at 18.9%. Although there are no major changes from last year’s results, we can see a trend toward lower budgets year by year.
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Recently, prices of food, daily necessities, electricity, etc. have continued to rise gradually due to the rise in raw material prices that have risen sharply since the fall of 2021, but we asked whether the price increases will affect spending during the year-end and New Year holidays. I did. A total of 82.1% answered that it had an impact, including those who said it had an impact (51.3%) and 30.8% who said it had a slight impact. I asked him what kind of impact it would have. Refrain from purchasing New Year’s dishes, gourmet foods, and New Year’s dishes during the New Year’s holidays (Female in her 50s) – I want to make the most of it because it’s a special occasion, but I want to be creative and get it done cheaply (Female in her 40s) – The quantity is smaller for the same price So, if I don’t have enough, I have to buy them separately. (Female in her 60s) ・The New Year’s items I usually buy have gone up in price, so I have to cut back on some of them (Male in my 40s) Others ・The cost of eating out is also rising So, I don’t think I need a year-end party (female in her 50s) – Utilities and other necessary items such as gasoline and kerosene are expensive, which is difficult (male in her 70s and older) (Male in his 50s) – Looking for something more reasonable (Male in his 50s) ■ The highest expense is “Osechi Ryori” A hybrid of homemade and purchased food is popular 39% of those who don’t eat it asked about the highest expense during the year-end and New Year holidays Saw. “Osechi cuisine” was the top choice at 18.8%. Perhaps due to the continued rise in prices of ingredients that decorate New Year’s dishes, this year as well as last year (2022: 19.0%) it ranked at the top. This is a close second with “New Year’s gifts” (18.4%), making them the two biggest expenses during the New Year. In third place was
“transportation expenses for returning home” (9.9%). This year, the spread of infectious diseases will subside, and there will likely be more opportunities to hand over New Year’s gifts in person. As you can see from the answer to the previous question, even though they want to reduce expenses due to price increases, they seem to be having difficulty cutting back on expenses for an annual event.
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We asked them about their plans to make and purchase osechi, which is their top expense. The most common response was “I plan to make some and purchase some” (34.4%), followed by “I plan to purchase all” (20.8%), and 55.2% of people answered that they plan to purchase. This is an increase of 6.9 points. The current New Year’s trend seems to be to buy osechi rather than make it all (5.8%). On the other hand, 39.0% of people answered that they do not eat osechi. People who answered “I don’t eat osechi” tended to have a higher proportion of their spending on “meat,” “sushi,” and “alcohol” during the year-end and New Year holidays than those who said they did eat osechi. ■16.9% plan to go to the first-time sale. There is a big difference in impressions between those who want to buy lucky bags and those who do not.
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When asked if they were planning to go to the first sales sale next year (January 2024), 16.9% of respondents answered “I plan to go/want to go,” the same as last year (16.9%). According to the survey before the coronavirus pandemic, it was 28.2% in 2018 and 26.1% in 2019, and it decreased to 15.0% in 2020 after the coronavirus. Although there has been a slight increase this year compared to the coronavirus pandemic, it does not seem to have recovered to pre-coronavirus levels. Among the items that people who answered that they “go/want to go” to the first-time sale said they planned to purchase were “clothing” (71.1%), “food (other than sweets)” at 48.1%, and “accessories (shoes, bags, etc.)” at 31.9%. It seems that things that people use and eat on a daily basis are popular.
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We also asked about the lucky bags lined up for sale for the first time. Only 15.5% of the respondents said they wanted to buy one, but when asked if they had ever purchased a lucky bag in the past, 61.6% said they had purchased one. When asked about their impressions of lucky bags, those who answered “I want to buy” said that the feeling of bargains and excitement were top of the list, but those who answered “I don’t want to buy” said that they “contained things I don’t need.” There were many negative responses such as “I’m worried because I can’t see what’s inside,” and there were differences in the images people had of lucky bags. ■Differences in how to eat ozoni between East and West: “It’s easy to make in the microwave” We asked people how to eat “ozoni,” which is one of the popular New Year’s dishes. 1st place overall was “Ozoni with baked square mochi” (33.9%). The first place in eastern Japan was “adding baked square mochi” at 48.4%, while the first place in western Japan was “boiling round mochi as is” at 32.9%, indicating a difference between east and west as it is a way of eating that is rooted in the region. It was noticeable. The most common open-ended answers were, “I cook rice cakes in the microwave and add them to ozoni” (a woman in her 60s), and “I only make the dashi soup and lentil the rice cakes” (a woman in her 50s). This was a quick and easy way to enjoy zoni. In addition, some people seem to enjoy zoni without mochi, such as “Homemade zoni with lots of ingredients without mochi” (female in her 20s) and “separate the dashi stock and mochi” (man in his 30s). .
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■Favorite way to eat rice cake: 1st place: soy sauce, 2nd place: sugar soy sauce, 3rd place: soybean flour (kinako) by a close margin [Image 10

When we asked them about their favorite way to eat rice cake, the number one answer was “soy sauce” (39.1%). 2nd place was “sugar soy sauce” (38.6%), and 3rd place was “kinako” (37.9%), both competing for familiar flavors. “Oshiruko/Zenzai”, which is a favorite to eat in winter, also has a steady popularity of 34.6%. Other ways to eat mochi that were mentioned were “Isobemaki wrapped in seaweed” (Female in 40s), “Mochi pizza with cheese” (Male in 20s), and “Butter and soy sauce” (Female in 50s). ) and “sprinkle cocoa” (female in her 30s), and seem to be enjoying a variety of arrangements, from sweet to salty. ■About Shufoo!’s New Year’s gift campaign where you can win 100,000 yen in cash
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https://www.shufoo.net * The product and service names mentioned in this news release are trademarks or registered trademarks of each company. *The information contained in the news release is current as of the date of the announcement. It is subject to change without prior notice. -reference-
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More details about this release:
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