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Home » Noto Peninsula Earthquake: Free tetanus vaccine provided to volunteers @Tokyo TMS Clinic & Shinjuku Quick Clinic

Noto Peninsula Earthquake: Free tetanus vaccine provided to volunteers @Tokyo TMS Clinic & Shinjuku Quick Clinic

Noto Peninsula Earthquake: Free tetanus vaccine provided to
volunteers @Tokyo TMS Clinic & Shinjuku Quick Clinic

*View in browser* *F Medical Equipment Co., Ltd.*
Press release: February 8, 2024
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Noto Peninsula Earthquake: Free tetanus vaccine provided to volunteers @Tokyo TMS Clinic & Shinjuku Quick Clinic
*Are tetanus antibodies safe? Cherish medical resources in
disaster-stricken areas*
We would like to express our deepest sympathies to everyone affected by the earthquake whose epicenter was in the Noto region of Ishikawa Prefecture.
Besuri-kai Medical Corporation
At Tokyo TMS Clinic and Shinjuku Quick Clinic, we have begun providing free tetanus vaccines to medical workers and volunteers who are going to the Noto Peninsula earthquake recovery effort.

As a background, Tokyo TMS Clinic and Shinjuku Quick Clinic are operated mainly by doctors who were students at Fukushima Medical University at the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake. As many people helped us on March 11th, we feel a sense of mission to be able to give back in some small way during the recent Noto Peninsula earthquake, and have decided to provide free tetanus vaccines.

* What is tetanus: *
Infection occurs mainly when the tetanus bacterium contained in dirt and sand enters the wound. It is a disease that can spread through even the smallest of wounds, causing symptoms such as numbness in the mouth and limbs, and the risk of death is high if treatment is delayed. According to the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, about 100 cases occur annually in Japan, of which 5-9 result in death. In the Great East Japan Earthquake, a total of 10 cases were reported in Miyagi and Iwate prefectures in March and April 2011, and although there were no fatalities as appropriate measures were taken, 7 cases were transported to the hospital. Three cases required treatment outside the three disaster-affected prefectures. Be careful when engaging in work that may cause injury, such as debris removal work. Let’s take precautions in advance to avoid getting infected and depriving medical resources in the disaster area.

* To avoid getting tetanus: *
If it has been more than 10 years since your last vaccination, be sure to get vaccinated before volunteering in a disaster-stricken area. For example, if you received the last dual DT vaccine (diphtheria/tetanus) at age 12, the recommended time for additional tetanus vaccination is at age 22.

* Do not bring infectious diseases to the disaster area! *
Disaster-stricken areas are environments where infectious diseases are more likely to occur and spread than the environments in which we usually live. This includes not only influenza and COVID-19, but also tetanus. To avoid wasting valuable medical resources in
disaster-stricken areas, if you are planning to volunteer, be sure to get a tetanus vaccination beforehand to ensure your immunity is at its peak. Tokyo TMS Clinic (in front of Ebisu Station) and Shinjuku Quick Clinic (in front of Shinjuku Station) are providing tetanus vaccines free of charge to those volunteering in the disaster-stricken areas. When volunteering in a disaster-stricken area, it is important that you do not contract or bring in infectious diseases yourself.

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